“Facts” that Provide Positive Results – rather than “Maybe’s”

Eating is a Necessity so get the most Benefit with Small mouthfuls and Maximum Chewing

By Lionel H. Phillips D.O.

The Human Body leaves nothing in its wake as being the most sophisticated miraculous consistent persistent accurate hard-working machine ever known to mankind. All this while continuing to function 24/7 for 100 and more years, in many cases while not being treated or serviced as is required. We marvel at all the high-tech innovations and invest billions to improve speed and accuracy and imaging, yet none of which holds a candle to the human body – our greatest asset without a sliver of doubt.

On Track. For the long road, the human body beats the car hands down.

It is a fact that the body has the ability for healing itself if given the chance. Think of how quickly and efficiently our bodies deal with damage, from a small cut to a cracked or broken bone. Similarly with an infection or a mild bout of food poisoning. Our entire system acts as a unit to protect, repair and heal itself. Each tiny part of the body and, in turn, each of its systems, is intimately connected to every other part and every other system. When the function of any part is less than 100 %, the rest of the systems are affected in some negative way or another.

The human body requires the minimum of care and knowledge in order to allow it to function efficiently. One would never dream of lowering the service requirements of any of our man-made assets, no matter how simple or complicated they may be. The result of not providing the body with its basic simple logical needs, is extremely costly. Examples are –

  1. THE EVER-INCREASING HEALTH-CARE CRISIS. Sickness, disease and general poor health is rising amongst all age groups as never before, with mounting costs to citizens and governments alike;
  2. Medical and health care services and waiting times for appointments are over-whelmed and stretched, as is the over-burdened pressure on the diligent medical personnel, albeit that they are short-staffed. The waiting times for many imaging units has become longer.
  3.  Poorer and less fortunate citizens are hardest hit, with many not having access to drinking water, food or medical services at all, particularly in African countries.  

Is there even one man-made object, no matter size or expense, that can compare to the human body?

An Interesting Fact about One Part of a System of the Human Body

Although the following is extremely complicated and technical, I believe it will provide some indication as to the wonders of the workings of our body.

If all arteriesveins, and capillaries of the human circulatory system were laid end to end, the total length would be 60,000 miles, or 100,000 km. That’s nearly two and a half times around the Earth! Even though its thickness averages just 2mm, your skin gets an eighth of all your blood supply.    

Let’s observe just one of the many functions, that of the Abdominal Arteries –

  • Celiac Trunk – Branching off from the abdominal aorta, the celiac trunk divides into smaller arteries that supply organs such as the stomach, liver and spleen.
  • Superior mesenteric. Also branching off of the abdominal aorta, it sends blood to the small intestinepancreas, and most of the large intestine.
  • Inferior mesenteric. Like the superior mesenteric artery, this artery also branches off of the abdominal aorta and supplies blood to the last portion of the large intestine, which includes the rectum.
  • Inferior phrenic. These are paired arteries that supply blood to the diaphragm.
  • Adrenal. The adrenal arteries are paired arteries that send blood to the adrenal glands.
  • Renal. These paired arteries deliver blood to the kidneys.
  • Lumbar. These paired arteries send blood to the vertebrae and spinal cord.
  • Gonadal. The gonadal arteries are paired arteries that send blood to the testes in males and the ovaries in females.
  • Common iliac. This branch of the abdominal aorta divides into the internal and external iliac arteries.
  • Internal iliac. Derived from the common iliac artery, this artery supplies blood to the bladder, pelvis, and external portion of the genitals. It also supplies the uterus and vagina in females.
  • External iliac. Also arising from the common iliac artery, this artery eventually becomes the femoral artery. All perfect in design and function.
The World Over. If all arteries and veins of the human circulatory system were laid end to end, the total length would be nearly two and a half times around the earth.


A QUICK BREAKDOWN OF WHAT YOU ARE MADE OF –
Number of Bones – 206
Number of Ribs – 24
Number of Bones in your Face – 22
Number of Bones in your Skull – 22
Number of Bones in your Neck – 7
Number of Bones in your Vertebral column – 33
Number of Bones in one Hand – 30
Normal Heart beats – 70 to 72 times per minute
Normal Blood Pressure – 120 / 80 mm of Hg.
Number of Cranial Nerves – 12 pairs
Number of Spinal Nerves – 31 pairs
Life Span of R.B.C.’S – Red Blood Cells – 120 days
Life Span of W.B.C.’S – White Blood Cells – 10 – 15 days
Life Span of Platelets – 5 – 9 days
Amount of Blood in the Body – 5 – 6 Liters.

Q:  How complicated and difficult and invasive is it to provide my body with its NEEDS?

A:  Not invasive in any way at all. Extremely simple to follow, if you give YOURSELF and YOUR BODY the chance to prove the benefits to be gained. 

First and foremost, focus on the suggestions and do your utmost to avoid being influenced by any ingrained habits leading you astray.  No dieting – no excessive exercise – no pills.

Something to ‘Chew On’What looks good will taste better with small mouthfuls  that are well-CHEWED.

Let us concentrate on How to Eat and Chew your food – any food:

Your Digestive System –

The digestive system involves the extremely complex process of absorbing the maximum nutrients from the food you eat, which the body uses for energy, growth and cell repair, in order to survive. The digestion process also involves eliminating the waste created by the whole process.  

The digestive tract (or gastrointestinal tract) is a long twisting tube that starts at the mouth and ends at the anus. It is made up of a series of muscles that coordinate the movement of food and other cells that produce enzymes and hormones to aid in the breakdown of food. Along the way there are other vital ‘accessory’ organs that are needed for digestion, among which are the esophagus, stomach, intestines – small and large, gallbladder, liver, and the pancreas.

The digestive system is truly a remarkable mechanism. During a person’s lifetime, it may process between 60,000 and 100,000 pounds (35,000 and 58,300 kgs.) of food

‘Taste’ of a Healthier Tomorrow

Digestion actually starts before you even take the first bite of a meal. The look and smell of food triggers the salivary glands in your mouth to secrete saliva, causing your mouth to water. When you actually taste the food and begin chewing, your tongue takes charge and moves the food to the appropriate teeth for grinding, mashing and cutting, as well as spreading it so as to become softer and warmer.  The enzymes in saliva begin to break down carbohydrates in the food.  After chewing, the tongue directs the food (now called a bolus) to the back of the mouth to be swallowed. It enters the esophagus and via peristalsis, continues on to the stomach, where the next stage of digestion occurs. The primary peristaltic wave forces the bolus down the esophagus and into the stomach which takes about 8–9 seconds. The esophagus is 23-37 cm long and only    1-2 cm. in diameter.

It helps to chew (masticate) your food to a maximum, in order for this process to be effective. SMALL MOUTHFULS AND MAXIMUM CHEWING is required. This helps with your digestion process and the absorption of the maximum Nutrients. And that’s it! Large mouthfuls cannot be chewed sufficiently, leaving a large amount in a state that will create all sorts of problems along the route.

Give it a full chance for a month and make a note of any changes that may have taken place – satisfaction, eating less, no feeling of over-eating or reflux and even fat loss. By the way, if small servings don’t suffice, you can always have a second.

However, the smaller helping should have been tastier and more satisfying. 





About the writer:

Lionel Phillips is a Doctor of Osteopathy (1975), an International Fitness & Health Instructor, Consultant and Lecturer. He has researched and designed ‘The Needs & Functions of the Human Body’ as an educational subject for inclusion in all School Curriculums World-Wide. A past Federation Member and Israel Liaison Representative of IHRSA (International, Health & Racquet Sports club Association) and member of their worldwide “Panel of Experts”, Phillips is a recipient of the “Prime Ministers Award of Merit” (PM Menachem Begin).

Lionel is contactable at: global@globalhealth-education.com


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